The only difference between the two sets of guns is their name and power. And the wind has blawin my plaid awa 19-23, "The Elfin Knight," "The Elfin Knight," "Every Rose Grows Merry in Time," "Flim-A-Lim-A-Lee" (4 texts) Fireside, p. 26, "Scarborough Fair" (1 text, 1 tune) Silber-FSWB, p. 151, "Scarborough Fair" (1 text); p. 152, "Cambric Shirt" (1 text) BBI, ZN821, "The elfin knight sits on yon hill" DT 2, SCARFAIR* An anime-exclusive set of guns Bayonetta has for the majority of the movie until they were shattered and replaced by the Scarborough Fair during Bayonetta’s second fight with Jeanne. I find it particularly valuable in what it may teach is about the importance of consent for witches when dealing with the Fair Folk in certain situations, particularly sexual ones. In its design, they are carbon copies of the original Scarborough Fair. Darling-NAS, pp. "Scarborough Fair," popularized in the United States by the 1960s singer-songwriting duo Simon & Garfunkel, is an English folk song about a market fair that took place in the town of Scarborough in Yorkshire during medieval times. The "impossible tasks" were a feature of the Scottish "Elfin Knight" ballads and the Scarborough Fair ballads probably borrowed from them as can be seen in the verses I've culled from an example of the lyrics: 1.THE Elfin Knight stands on yon hill, Blaw, blaw, blaw winds, blaw Blawing his horn loud and shrill. c.smitty # Posted by c.smitty 12 years ago. Thanks for the info. It looks at material from the ballad 'The Elfin Knight' and what we may learn from it as people interested in fairylore. The characters in the Elfin Knight (of which Scarborough Fair is a version) are a demon and a maid. Also, I think it has older roots. The Elfin Knight. The herbs mentioned in the refrain of Scarborough Fair (parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme) are all known to have been closely associated with death and also as charms against the evil eye. This is one of my favourite songs. The way I understand it, after researching, is that the Elfin Knight gives some mortal lady love a list of impossible tasks to indicate the futility of their relationship. Scarborough is just around the corner from where I was born and grew up, so we used to hear it before S&G got hold of it. The characters in the Elfin Knight (of which Scarborough Fair is a version) are a demon and a maid. The herbs mentioned in the refrain of Scarborough Fair (parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme) are all known to have been closely associated with death and also as charms against the evil eye. The elf-knight blows a magic horn that makes any who hear its sound fall in love. Like any fair, it attracted traders, entertainers and food vendors, along with other hangers-on. The lyrics of "Scarborough Fair" appear to have something in common with a Scottish ballad, “The Elfin Knight,” which has been traced at least as far back as 1650, and very possibly earlier. The song had it's origins as far back as 1253 when Henry VIII (I’m not going to edit it to III, I’ve never seen an autocorrect fail cause so many smug comments) proclaimed that there would be a fair from mid August until September. though. The Elfin Knight is one of the few ballads to gain international popularity in recent years when Paul Simon adapted an arrangement of Scarborough Fair and added a lyrical counter melody in his pleasant variation of the ballad. Scarborough Fair Are you going to Scarborough Fair? This is a riddling song but in this ballad the riddle is more in the form of impossible tasks.